Thursday

Lawn Maintenance Business Tip: How To Charge For Spring Clean Up

The more you know the better. If you could gather prices from competitors who are offering this service that will help you gauge what your market is currently paying.

This is a key step for your lawn maintenance business.

The good news is that you shouldn't get caught in trying to be perfect. The price you decide to set may be too high or it may be too low but you can always adjust. There's plenty of business and it doesn't take much to make a lot of money.

Ask yourself what you want to make each hour and try to gauge how many hours a particular job would take. How much does it cost to dump the debris you collect? How long does it take you dethatch an area?

You see if you begin to systematically take notes on how long projects take you will be essentially giving yourself some very valuable information.

You start with recording one job and that will help you determine the next and so on.

Its not an overnight process but one job after the other and you'll be getting much more accurate with your bidding.

Don't get caught in the paralysis of analysis. Get out and do your best to guesstimate. If you're off, adjust for the next quote.

Through experience you'll be able to get much more accurate and your lawn maintenance business will get that much more profitable.

Does that make sense?

Hope this helps.


The Staff
http://www.howtostartyourlawncarebusiness.com/

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1 Comments:

Anonymous Nick said...

You're right! When starting up a business, pricing is always what got me stuck. We shouldn't be paralyzed by over analyzing our rates. Sometimes it's best to let things flow and learn from our previous client experiences.

April 29, 2008  

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